Tuesday Nights at the Movies Image 1

Tuesday Nights at the Movies

On Tuesday nights, Woodmere’s main gallery is transformed into an intimate setting for screenings of rare and underseen films as well as classics. Tuesday Nights at the Movies is presented with the Chestnut Hill Film Group and sponsored by the Chestnut Hill Local.
Donations suggested

7:30-9:30 p.m. (doors open at 7 p.m.)


2022-2023: 50TH ANNIVERSARY "BEST OF" SEASON!
 
SEPTEMBER 27: CASABLANCA (1942 / 102 minutes)
Rick loses his idealism when he loses Ilsa amidst the chaos of World War II, opening a bar in neutral Casablanca to lick his wounds.  Then, “of all the gin joints in all the towns in all the world” Ilsa walks into Rick's.  This endlessly absorbing triumph of the Hollywood system stars Humphrey Bogart, Ingrid Bergman, Claude Rains, Peter Lorre, and Dooley Wilson as Sam.
    In 1989, Casablanca was selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry by the Library of Congress as being "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant."
 
OCTOBER 11: SEVEN MEN FROM NOW (1956 / 78 minutes)
A former sheriff blames himself for his wife's death during a Wells Fargo robbery. He begins a quest to hunt down and kill the seven men responsible.  The first of the Budd Boetticher directed westerns starring Randolph Scott. Lee Marvin steals the show. Rousing title ballad.
 
OCTOBER 18: ROMAN HOLIDAY (1953 / 118 minutes)
On a visit to the Eternal City, a Princess played by Audrey Hepburn, steals away from her embassy and embarks on a day pretending to be a commoner. Gregory Peck is an expatriate news service newspaperman out to exploit the Princess—until romance smolders between them. Directed by William Wyler. Co-writer Dalton Trumbo (who was originally uncredited as a result of being on The Hollywood Blacklist).
    In 1999, Roman Holiday was selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry by the Library of Congress as being "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant."
 
OCTOBER 25: THE GARDEN OF THE FINZI-CONTINIS (1970 / 94 minutes)
Already sequestered by their ostentatious wealth in the gothic, Eden-like Ferrara estate which they seldom leave, a wealthy Italian-Jewish family ignores the incremental rise of the Fascists, foolishly believing that their money will protect them. Director Vittorio De Sica's brisk, erotic, elegiac and unsentimental penultimate feature film stars magnetic Dominique Sanda and suave Fabio Testi.
 
NOVEMBER 1: THE NIGHT OF THE HUNTER (1955 / 92 minutes)
Unusual and emblematic thriller about an evil Preacher's murderous and greedy quest for stolen money and the siblings who flee from him. Part film noir, and part Expressionist fairy tale, the only film directed by actor Charles Laughton. Adapted for the screen by James Agee. Career-best performances from Robert Mitchum, Shelly Winters, and Lillian Gish (in a luminous mid-career supporting turn). Stunning and haunting B&W cinematography by Stanley Cortez.
    In 1992, The Night of the Hunter was selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry by the Library of Congress as being "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant."
 
NOVEMBER 8: TO BE OR NOT TO BE (1942 / 99 minutes)
Ernst Lubitsch put his unique "touch" on this more-timely-than-ever tragical farce (or farcical tragedy) wherein Jack Benny leads a troupe of hammy actors in miraculously thwarting the Nazi's attempt to track down members of the Polish Resistance. Screwball comedy icon Carole Lombard is topped billed (in her final screen role).
    In 1996, To Be Or Not To Be was selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry by the Library of Congress as being "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant."
 
NOVEMBER 15: THE EARRINGS OF MADAME DE... (1953 / 105 minutes)
Charles Boyer, Danielle Darrieux, and Vittorio De Sica star in Max Ophüls’ elegant, sardonic and voluptuous tale of romantic intrigue, adultery, and betrayed indiscretions in fin de siècle Europe. Vastly influential, and reported to be Stanley Kubrick's favorite movie.
 
NOVEMBER 22: THE LONG GOOD FRIDAY (1980 / 114 minutes)
Gritty, violent British gangster film starring Bob Hoskins as an underworld kingpin wooing American mobsters while fending off threats from the Irish Republican Army. Co-starring a young and vivacious Helen Mirren. Viewer discretion advised. 
 
NOVEMBER 29: 'B' PICTURE DOUBLE FEATURE: 
DICK TRACY MEETS GRUESOME (1947 / 65m) 
Ralph Byrd's Dick Tracy faces off against Boris Karloff in what is widely considered one of the great comic book adaptations of all time.
 
THE BRUTE MAN (1946 / 58m) 
Rondo Hatton is “The Creeper,” a disfigured psychopath who befriends a blind woman who may be able to curb the murderous rage in his heart. Co-starring Tom Neal.
 
Projected on archival 16mm prints by THE SECRET CINEMA.
 
DECEMBER 6: TOP HAT (1935 / 101 minutes)
American tap dancer Fred Astaire woes fashion model Ginger Rodgers in director Mark Sandrich's Art Deco screwball musical comedy. Sensational Irving Berlin songs include, "No Strings (I'm Fancy Free)," "Isn't This a Lovely Day (to Be Caught in the Rain)?," "Top Hat, White Tie and Tails," "Cheek to Cheek," and "The Piccolino."
    In 1990, Top Hat was selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry by the Library of Congress as being "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant."
 
DECEMBER 13: REMEMBER THE NIGHT (1940 / 94 minutes)
Mitchell Leisen directs, and Friedrich Hollaender scores the love story between shoplifter Barbara Stanwyck and prosecutor Fred MacMurray in screenwriter Preston Sturges’ Christmastime fable.